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fluffyplant:

invisiblesbians:

4gifs:

The floor is lava. [vid]

This is one of the best gifs

omfg I’ve only ever seen the end part of this gif this is amazing

fluffyplant:

invisiblesbians:

4gifs:

The floor is lava. [vid]

This is one of the best gifs

omfg I’ve only ever seen the end part of this gif this is amazing

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via molasses-feet)

glimmer-twats:

Mods dancing in the video for The Who’s I Can’t Explain

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

avianawareness:

THEY JUST KEEP GETTING BETTER

avianawareness:

THEY JUST KEEP GETTING BETTER

(via satelliteyellow)

The chief trick to making good mistakes is not to hide them — especially not from yourself.
– Happy birthday, philosopher Daniel Dennett! Celebrate with his magnificent piece on the art-science of making good mistakes. (via explore-blog)
The Clash – The Call Up

The Call Up — The Clash (Sandinista!, 1980)

better audio quality

(Source: dailyclash)

sinobug:

An Ant On Any Other Day  This “ant” grooming itself caught my attention and, at first, I convinced myself it was actually an ant-mimicking mantis nymph. Only on editing the image, did the slim waist, forelegs and antennae not seem right, even for the most bizarre mantis.  So, I introduce to you a Female Parasitoid Wasp (Dryinidae, Hymenoptera).  The Dryinidae are a family of hymenopteran insects, with about 1,400 described species found worldwide. These are solitary wasps whose larvae are parasitoids on other insects. The only known hosts are Hemiptera, especially leafhoppers. Adults of these insects are generally fairly small, to a maximum length of 10 mm. Males are usually fully winged, but females are often completely wingless and closely resemble ants.  The eggs are injected into the host using a sharp ovipositor and the larva spends its early stages feeding internally on the host, but when larger, it starts to protrude from the abdomen of the host and develops a hardened sac-like “case” to protect its vulnerable body while continuing to feed on the host, which is eventually killed.  In hindsight, they are instantly recognisable by the chelate (claw-like) front legs: they have a pretarsal ungue interacting with a large projection on the fifth tarsomere. This is used to grab the host when ovipositing. This is also what I initially assumed to be a mantis foreleg.  by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

An Ant On Any Other Day

This “ant” grooming itself caught my attention and, at first, I convinced myself it was actually an ant-mimicking mantis nymph. Only on editing the image, did the slim waist, forelegs and antennae not seem right, even for the most bizarre mantis.

So, I introduce to you a Female Parasitoid Wasp (Dryinidae, Hymenoptera).

The Dryinidae are a family of hymenopteran insects, with about 1,400 described species found worldwide. These are solitary wasps whose larvae are parasitoids on other insects. The only known hosts are Hemiptera, especially leafhoppers.
Adults of these insects are generally fairly small, to a maximum length of 10 mm. Males are usually fully winged, but females are often completely wingless and closely resemble ants.

The eggs are injected into the host using a sharp ovipositor and the larva spends its early stages feeding internally on the host, but when larger, it starts to protrude from the abdomen of the host and develops a hardened sac-like “case” to protect its vulnerable body while continuing to feed on the host, which is eventually killed.

In hindsight, they are instantly recognisable by the chelate (claw-like) front legs: they have a pretarsal ungue interacting with a large projection on the fifth tarsomere. This is used to grab the host when ovipositing. This is also what I initially assumed to be a mantis foreleg.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

(via somuchscience)

fluffyplant:

invisiblesbians:

4gifs:

The floor is lava. [vid]

This is one of the best gifs

omfg I’ve only ever seen the end part of this gif this is amazing

fluffyplant:

invisiblesbians:

4gifs:

The floor is lava. [vid]

This is one of the best gifs

omfg I’ve only ever seen the end part of this gif this is amazing

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via molasses-feet)

glimmer-twats:

Mods dancing in the video for The Who’s I Can’t Explain

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

avianawareness:

THEY JUST KEEP GETTING BETTER

avianawareness:

THEY JUST KEEP GETTING BETTER

(via satelliteyellow)

The chief trick to making good mistakes is not to hide them — especially not from yourself.
– Happy birthday, philosopher Daniel Dennett! Celebrate with his magnificent piece on the art-science of making good mistakes. (via explore-blog)

(Source: lemanoosh, via thebrownarch)

scarletpeacock:

Uhhhh

scarletpeacock:

Uhhhh

(Source: mimiherrero, via tammyrara)

sinobug:

An Ant On Any Other Day  This “ant” grooming itself caught my attention and, at first, I convinced myself it was actually an ant-mimicking mantis nymph. Only on editing the image, did the slim waist, forelegs and antennae not seem right, even for the most bizarre mantis.  So, I introduce to you a Female Parasitoid Wasp (Dryinidae, Hymenoptera).  The Dryinidae are a family of hymenopteran insects, with about 1,400 described species found worldwide. These are solitary wasps whose larvae are parasitoids on other insects. The only known hosts are Hemiptera, especially leafhoppers. Adults of these insects are generally fairly small, to a maximum length of 10 mm. Males are usually fully winged, but females are often completely wingless and closely resemble ants.  The eggs are injected into the host using a sharp ovipositor and the larva spends its early stages feeding internally on the host, but when larger, it starts to protrude from the abdomen of the host and develops a hardened sac-like “case” to protect its vulnerable body while continuing to feed on the host, which is eventually killed.  In hindsight, they are instantly recognisable by the chelate (claw-like) front legs: they have a pretarsal ungue interacting with a large projection on the fifth tarsomere. This is used to grab the host when ovipositing. This is also what I initially assumed to be a mantis foreleg.  by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

An Ant On Any Other Day

This “ant” grooming itself caught my attention and, at first, I convinced myself it was actually an ant-mimicking mantis nymph. Only on editing the image, did the slim waist, forelegs and antennae not seem right, even for the most bizarre mantis.

So, I introduce to you a Female Parasitoid Wasp (Dryinidae, Hymenoptera).

The Dryinidae are a family of hymenopteran insects, with about 1,400 described species found worldwide. These are solitary wasps whose larvae are parasitoids on other insects. The only known hosts are Hemiptera, especially leafhoppers.
Adults of these insects are generally fairly small, to a maximum length of 10 mm. Males are usually fully winged, but females are often completely wingless and closely resemble ants.

The eggs are injected into the host using a sharp ovipositor and the larva spends its early stages feeding internally on the host, but when larger, it starts to protrude from the abdomen of the host and develops a hardened sac-like “case” to protect its vulnerable body while continuing to feed on the host, which is eventually killed.

In hindsight, they are instantly recognisable by the chelate (claw-like) front legs: they have a pretarsal ungue interacting with a large projection on the fifth tarsomere. This is used to grab the host when ovipositing. This is also what I initially assumed to be a mantis foreleg.

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese Hymenopterans (wasps, hornets, bees, ants and sawflies) on my Flickr site HERE…..

(via somuchscience)

"The chief trick to making good mistakes is not to hide them — especially not from yourself."
The Clash – The Call Up

The Call Up — The Clash (Sandinista!, 1980)

better audio quality

(Source: dailyclash)

About:

The Pilsooki Challenge is derived from Dream High, KBS 2011, Episode 8: loose 30 kg in 200 days.

This blog will follow both food, nutrition and fitness, and the relationships associated thereof. -- With the above quest in mind. Fighting!

(Oh yeah and to learning to b-boy and free run through the forest by 40 (8year countdown!)

Also: learning using the diaphragm of (Japanese and Korean) pop culture....err and music, in general, probably.